Chase Cabinetry - Kitchen and Bathroom Cabinets and Countertops

Frequently Asked Questions (F A Q)

 

Here is an extensive list of the top questions asked over the last 20 years.
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  • How much will my cabinets cost?
  • Cabinets vary dramatically in price just like cars or houses. Entry-level cabinets are less expensive than cabinets with special finishes and upgraded storage features. Chase provides cabinetry that fits most any budget—from entry level to ultra-luxurious.
  • After I order my cabinets, how long will it take to receive them?
  • Generally, four weeks. However, order times vary depending on the manufacturer and the complexity of the job. The minimum time is roughly three weeks and can be as much as eight weeks during peak times of the year.

  • What is the difference between a face frame and frameless cabinet?
  • Chase Cabinetry has developed a glossary of cabinetry terms. If the term you are looking for is not included, please complete the contact form and direct any question to our team of experts. We will be glad to assist you in any way possible.
  • Are environmentally 'green' cabinets available at a reasonable price?
  • Yes. Chase Cabinetry represents several manufacturers across all price ranges, even entry-level, whose cabinets are certified under the Environmental Stewardship Program developed by the KCMA (Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association).
  • What are the most popular types of cabinets?
  • While popular cabinet styles and trends vary from year to year, traditional raised-panel oak styling is always a favorite due to affordability and durability. Besides oak, certain wood species tend to be favored by today's consumers. Maple is frequently used in remodeling because of its clean look and its ability to blend in with most existing finishes. Cherry has become increasingly popular as manufacturers have developed a variety of finishes allowing it to work in more applications.

  • Can I choose a kitchen cabinet to match existing furniture?
  • In all likelihood, yes. Though the kind of wood and stains change their color considerably over time, with the variety of materials available, it should be possible to find something that fits well with your existing furniture.

  • What's the difference between manufactured cabinets and custom-made cabinets?
  • Years ago there was a significant difference in the sizes and finishes available from "custom" cabinetmakers and the "stock" manufacturers. Today, many cabinet manufacturers offer custom sizing and finishes that rival, and may even exceed, the possibilities of a local custom cabinet shop.
  • Do you provide cabinets for remodels only?
  • Chase provides cabinets for Front Range residential, commercial and construction customers engaged in both remodeling and new construction alike. Recently, Chase has become a favorite among the real estate investor and 'fix-n-flip' crowds.
  • How can I possibly pay for a new kitchen?
  • Like any major purchase, you should only spend what you can afford to spend. That means setting a budget and sticking to it. If you work with a professional kitchen designer, he'll help you make the most of it - and he'll respect the budget you've set. As for payment, there are a number of options. Some homeowners tap into personal savings to get the kitchen of their dreams, others take out home equity loans.
  • What can I do myself to help cut costs?
  • How much you can or should attempt to do depends on your ability and knowledge of remodeling. You'll definitely be able to tear out old cabinets (be careful not to damage walls and beams), take up old vinyl flooring and handle trash removal. You may also want to paint or wallpaper on your own. You're better off letting the pros handle plumbing and appliance hook-ups -- if you try it on your own, you may violate building codes or invalidate manufacturer warranties. And let a professional installer put your new cabinets in so that they look their best.
  • What makes a kitchen more or less expensive?
  • Cabinets account for about half the total cost of the project and will have the greatest impact on your budget. They range in price considerably based on quality, the type of material they are made of, and whether they are or custom built (produced specifically for your kitchen in whatever sizes are needed). The material you choose for surfaces including counters, backsplashes and floors can also account for variations in price. Other key elements that factor in to the equation are talent and workmanship. In the remodeling business, you tend to get what you pay for. An accomplished designer, skilled sub-tradesmen and expert installation crew may cost more. But you'll appreciate their ability every time you use your kitchen.
  • What construction features should I look for when choosing my cabinets?
  • Certain construction features are a sign of quality cabinets. A savvy consumer will look for things such as finished backs in all cabinets, drawer guides that also support the drawer bottom, conversion varnish (not lacquer) finishes, multi-way adjustable hinges, adjustable shelves, and a wide range of heights and depths. Newer convenience features include “soft-close” hinges and drawers, multi-function drawer systems, and optional task lighting.
  • What makes a kitchen more or less expensive?
  • Cabinets account for about half the total cost of the project and will have the greatest impact on your budget. They range in price considerably based on quality, the type of material they are made of, and whether they are or custom built (produced specifically for your kitchen in whatever sizes are needed). The material you choose for surfaces including counters, backsplashes and floors can also account for variations in price. Other key elements that factor in to the equation are talent and workmanship. In the remodeling business, you tend to get what you pay for. An accomplished designer, skilled sub-tradesmen and expert installation crew may cost more. But you'll appreciate their ability every time you use your kitchen.
  • Caution! Self-cleaning appliances generate intense heat during a cleaning cycle and the integrity of the appliance seal or gasket may be compromised with age, improper installation, etc. We recommend the removal of doors and/or drawers from cabinets adjacent to, or directly above, an appliance during a cleaning cycle to prevent possible finish or surface damage.

  • How should I care for my cabinets?
  • Each manufacturer provides specific cleaning and care instructions depending upon your cabinet's material and finish. Please read and adhere to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Here are the basics: Never allow water to stand or dry. Wash your cabinets with diluted mild soap and a clean, damp cloth. Always dry the surface immediately with a clean cloth. Avoid draping damp or wet dish towels over the door of the sink base cabinet. Using abrasives of any sort is destructive to the finish. Avoid using spray-on polishes and other cleaning polishes that contain wax, petroleum solvents or silicones. Acetones, acetates, and ethyl alcohol will destroy finishes, glazes, and painted surfaces. Always use extreme caution when cleaning your hinges and drawer pulls with any sort of metal polish, as they contain harsh chemicals which may damage any finish.
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